alewife

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Visitors observe alewives congregating in the historic Damariscotta Mills fish ladder that is undergoing restoration in Nobleboro, Maine. In the spring of 2012 more than 400,000 alewives passed through the ladder, located about sixteen miles inland from the Gulf of Maine, on their annual spawning migration to Damariscotta Lake.

AP Photo/Råobert F. Bukaty

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Visitors observe alewives congregating in the historic Damariscotta Mills fish ladder that is undergoing restoration in Nobleboro, Maine. In the spring of 2012 more than 400,000 alewives passed through the ladder, located about sixteen miles inland from the Gulf of Maine, on their annual spawning migration to Damariscotta Lake.

AP Photo/Råobert F. Bukaty

Thumb

Visitors observe alewives congregating in the historic Damariscotta Mills fish ladder that is undergoing restoration in Nobleboro, Maine. In the spring of 2012 more than 400,000 alewives passed through the ladder, located about sixteen miles inland from the Gulf of Maine, on their annual spawning migration to Damariscotta Lake.

AP Photo/Råobert F. Bukaty
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