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For general comments, suggestions, or questions concerning Natural History or www.naturalhistorymagazine.com:

Natural History Magazine, Inc.

PO Box 110623

Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-5623

Phone: 919-933-1867
Email: nhmag@naturalhistorymag.com

For subscription questions please visit our on-line Customer Care center.

Letters to the Editor

Natural History welcomes correspondence from readers. Letters should be sent via e-mail to nhmag@naturalhistorymag.com . All letters should include a daytime telephone number, and all letters may be edited for length and clarity.

Back Issues

Natural History has back issues for sale from 1999–present. Each issue costs $7 (includes shipping and handling). Special issues “Darwin and Evolution,” November 2005, and “Water,” November 2007, are no longer available. Please add $3 extra shipping for international orders.

Send your request along with a check made payable to “Natural History” to:

Natural History
Attn: Back Issues
PO Box 110623
Research Triangle Park, NC 27713-6650

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Natural History Magazine, Inc.
PO Box 110623
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-5623
Phone: 919-933-1867
Email: charris@nhmag.com

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Howard Richman, Publisher
203-861-6262
hrichman@richmanmediasales.com

Museum Information

For general information about the American Museum of Natural History and its departments, the Museum shops, current exhibitions, and any other visitor information, please call 212-769-5100, or go to www.amnh.org.

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